NerdHerder is an exciting new kind of motion-controlled table-top augmented reality puzzle game. Players help nerds avoid managers, deal with annoying paperwork, overcome their fear of sports, and chase down donuts, coffee and techie toys!

Nerdherder is an experimental game, created by students in the Augmented Reality Game Studio at Georgia Tech (made possible through the generous support of Qualcomm). This collaborative studio brings together students from the Georgia Institute of Technology, the Savannah College of Art and Design (Atlanta Campus) and the Berklee College of Music.

Nerdherder grew out of our research into augmented reality game experiences, during which we created many different game prototypes (visithttp://argamestudio.org to see videos of the other prototypes)

All you need for play is a smart phone and a game board downloaded fromhttp://micronerd.net/print
For iOS devices, NerdHerder runs on the iPhone 4S, iPad2 and the new iPad. Link to NerdHerder in the app store:http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/nerdherder/id524351089
For Android devices, NerdHerder runs on recent high-end Android devices with fast CPUs and GPUs. Link to NerdHerder in google play:https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=edu.gatech.NerdHerder
———————————-

Volcano Fever is a handheld augmented reality game designed to teach proper condom use in a playful way. The game was inspired by a desire to leverage vision-based AR to create an fun game that uses the condom package itself as the physical prop to which the game is attached.

The game was developed by Anna Mansour (Georgia Tech), Michael Downing (Georgia Tech), Bryan Hickerson (Georgia Tech), Leigh Ann Kinnison (SCAD), Mae Tidman (Georgia Tech), Jia Zhang (Georgia Tech), Tarick Khalaf (Georgia Tech), and Jason Lee (Georgia Tech) in the Qualcomm Augmented Reality Game Studio at Georgia Tech (‪http://www.argamestudio.org‬). This Qualcomm-funded research studio is a collaborative effort between the Augmented Environments Lab at Georgia Tech, and the Interactive Design and Game Development program at Savannah College of Art and Design. The Studio is led by Blair MacIntyre (GT) and Tony Tseng (SCAD).




This game was built for Android phones, using Unity3D and the Qualcomm AR SDK plugin (‪http://ar.qualcomm.com/‬).

Show less

Eye-controlled Gaze TV unveiled by Haier and Tobii
An eye-controlled television has been unveiled at Berlin’s IFA trade show.
Haier’s Gaze TV uses technology developed by Tobii, a Swedish firm which already offers eye-tracking technology for computers.
Users control the set by staring at the top or bottom of the screen to activate a user-interface.
The user can then change the volume, switch channel or carry out other functions by looking at icons shown on the display.
The technology is still at prototype stage and prone to glitches, but it has the potential to offer an alternative to the traditional remote control.
Existing smart TV’s also offer hand gesture and voice controls as alternatives, but again the functions can be hit-and-miss in real-world use.

Eye-controlled Gaze TV unveiled by Haier and Tobii

An eye-controlled television has been unveiled at Berlin’s IFA trade show.

Haier’s Gaze TV uses technology developed by Tobii, a Swedish firm which already offers eye-tracking technology for computers.

Users control the set by staring at the top or bottom of the screen to activate a user-interface.

The user can then change the volume, switch channel or carry out other functions by looking at icons shown on the display.

The technology is still at prototype stage and prone to glitches, but it has the potential to offer an alternative to the traditional remote control.

Existing smart TV’s also offer hand gesture and voice controls as alternatives, but again the functions can be hit-and-miss in real-world use.

Nokia in 2015

Vibrating “Lorm” Glove Helps Deaf-Blind People Send Text Messages

by , 04/10/12

For people who are both deaf and blind, the hurdles in communicating with others can often lead to crippling social isolation. A new “smart” glove by Germany’s Design Research Lab, however, allows its wearer to compose and transmit messages to smartphones or other mobile devices. Based on a hand-touch language known as Lorm, which assigns letters of the alphabet to different parts of one’s palm, the glove includes textile pressure sensors that allow the user to “lorm” onto his or her own hand to compose a message, then transmit it to the intended recipient through the magic of Bluetooth.

Pirate Bay to allow real-object downloads
The Pirate Bay, one of the world’s most infamous online piracy and file-sharing sites, is now hosting a type of mock-up file that allows your 3D printer to create physical objects.
ThePirateBay.org yesterday announced via its blog, first reported by GigaOM, that users can now search in a new category called “Physibles”.
Physibles, as the blog explains, are mock-up files that allow a 3D printer to create a physical object:
"We believe that the next step in copying will be made from digital form into physical form. It will be physical objects. Or, as we decided to call them: Physibles.
"Data objects that are able (and feasible) to become physical. We believe that things like three-dimensional printers, scanners and such are just the first step. We believe that in the nearby future, you will print your spare parts for your vehicles," The Pirate Bay predicted in its post yesterday.
The site, well known due to accusations of it aiding and abetting copyright infringement, took a philanthropic approach to the announcement, saying that it would likely change the world in a matter of years.
"The benefit to society is huge. No more shipping huge amount of products around the world. No more shipping the broken products back. No more child labour. We’ll be able to print food for hungry people. We’ll be able to share not only a recipe, but the full meal," the blog reads.
There are currently seven physible models hosted on The Pirate Bay, including a mock-up file for a pirate ship, a tabletop gaming model and a hot-rod model.
A wide range of 3D printers were shown off at this year’s Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, including one from MakerBot Industries — the MakerBot Replicator — available for US$1749.

Pirate Bay to allow real-object downloads

The Pirate Bay, one of the world’s most infamous online piracy and file-sharing sites, is now hosting a type of mock-up file that allows your 3D printer to create physical objects.

ThePirateBay.org yesterday announced via its blog, first reported by GigaOM, that users can now search in a new category called “Physibles”.

Physibles, as the blog explains, are mock-up files that allow a 3D printer to create a physical object:

"We believe that the next step in copying will be made from digital form into physical form. It will be physical objects. Or, as we decided to call them: Physibles.

"Data objects that are able (and feasible) to become physical. We believe that things like three-dimensional printers, scanners and such are just the first step. We believe that in the nearby future, you will print your spare parts for your vehicles," The Pirate Bay predicted in its post yesterday.

The site, well known due to accusations of it aiding and abetting copyright infringement, took a philanthropic approach to the announcement, saying that it would likely change the world in a matter of years.

"The benefit to society is huge. No more shipping huge amount of products around the world. No more shipping the broken products back. No more child labour. We’ll be able to print food for hungry people. We’ll be able to share not only a recipe, but the full meal," the blog reads.

There are currently seven physible models hosted on The Pirate Bay, including a mock-up file for a pirate ship, a tabletop gaming model and a hot-rod model.

A wide range of 3D printers were shown off at this year’s Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, including one from MakerBot Industries — the MakerBot Replicator — available for US$1749.

DARPA Works On Virtual Reality Contact Lenses

Digital images could be directly projected onto lenses to improve soldiers’ situational awareness.
By Elizabeth Montalbano, InformationWeekFebruary 01, 2012 01:03 PM
The Department of Defense (DOD) is working on contact lenses that would enhance soldiers’ vision to improve intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) activities without the need for specialized equipment that is currently used in the battlefield.
The Defense Advanced Research Projects (DARPA) agency is doing work at Washington-based Innovega iOptiks to create wearable eye lenses with tiny, full-color displays onto which digital images can be projected to give the wearers better situational awareness, according to the agency.
The lenses would allow users to focus simultaneously on images that are both close up and far away, which would improve their ability to use portable displays while still interacting in real time with the environment around them, according to DARPA. A graphic on the agency’s website shows the basic design of the lenses. 

DARPA Works On Virtual Reality Contact Lenses

Digital images could be directly projected onto lenses to improve soldiers’ situational awareness.

Virtual projection lets you share your phone’s screen

Want to show that must-see video to your friends, but don’t want to crowd around a tiny screen? Or perhaps you have an important document on your handset to share during a large meeting. You could try a phone with a built-in projector, but wouldn’t it be easier to use your regular device? Now you can, thanks to “virtual projection”, a system for sharing your screen on to any nearby display.

It works like this: when you hold your phone up to the screen of a computer running the virtual projection software, the phone’s camera constantly captures and compares images from the screen to work out its location. This information is passed back to the computer via Wi-Fi to place the virtual projection in the right place on the screen.

Moving the phone will rotate and distort the image just like a regular optical projector, but it is also possible to turn this off, giving you a stable image even if you move and allowing you to put the phone down. Multiple users can also place images on the same screen, allowing them to work together.

Computerized contact lens will keep you up to date with news and texts! Messages and images you can turn on and off would appear in front of your eyes. Scientists have developed a prototype hands free lens; this is the concept of info-vision — the ability to stream data directly in front of a person’s field of vision.

The lenses can be inserted just like normal contacts, and shouldn’t obstruct your field of vision. They are created by Professor Babak Parviz, a contact lens engineer. So far, he has created a lens with tiny components, electronic circuit, a LED light and a antenna that picks up information and power through a wireless connection. The professor believes one day we will stream all our information onto our contact lens.

    
NY Times article heralds the era of wearable computing, evolving from smartphones –“Disruptions: Wearing Your Computer on Your Sleeve”
By NICK BILTON
 | December 18, 2011, 9:54 PM 
Instead of going through life staring into a mobile device, people one day may be able to wear a computer….

NY Times article heralds the era of wearable computing, evolving from smartphones –“Disruptions: Wearing Your Computer on Your Sleeve”

By NICK BILTON

 | December 18, 2011, 9:54 PM 

Instead of going through life staring into a mobile device, people one day may be able to wear a computer….