Why Smart Glasses Might Not Make You Smarter
A Q&A with wearable-computer pioneer Steve Mann
Steve Mann built his first smart eyeglasses when he was still in high school and has continued to improve on his designs ever since—as a graduate student at MIT and now as a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Toronto. The author of Cyborg: Digital Destiny and Human Potential in the Age of the Wearable Computer, he’s considered one of the world’s foremost experts on how the use of computer prostheses can extend human abilities. He’s also been wearing one version or another of his smart eyeglasses for more than three decades. In June, he’ll be hosting the2013 IEEE International Symposium on Technology and Society in Toronto, which will focus on wearable computing and the rise of augmented and mediated reality.
Mann recently spoke with IEEE Spectrum about the new wave of head-up displays coming on the market, such as Google Glass. He talked about the benefits they might offer as well as possible design flaws and the potential for abuse.

Why Smart Glasses Might Not Make You Smarter

A Q&A with wearable-computer pioneer Steve Mann

Steve Mann built his first smart eyeglasses when he was still in high school and has continued to improve on his designs ever since—as a graduate student at MIT and now as a professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Toronto. The author of Cyborg: Digital Destiny and Human Potential in the Age of the Wearable Computer, he’s considered one of the world’s foremost experts on how the use of computer prostheses can extend human abilities. He’s also been wearing one version or another of his smart eyeglasses for more than three decades. In June, he’ll be hosting the2013 IEEE International Symposium on Technology and Society in Toronto, which will focus on wearable computing and the rise of augmented and mediated reality.

Mann recently spoke with IEEE Spectrum about the new wave of head-up displays coming on the market, such as Google Glass. He talked about the benefits they might offer as well as possible design flaws and the potential for abuse.

U.S. Spies See Superhumans, Instant Cities by 2030
BY NOAH SHACHTMAN 12.10.12
3-D printed organs. Brain chips providing superhuman abilities. Megacities, built from scratch. The U.S. intelligence community is taking a look at the world of 2030. And it is very, very sci-fi.
Every four or five years, the futurists at the National Intelligence Council take a stab at forecasting what the globe will be like two decades hence; the idea is to give some long-term, strategic guidance to the folks shaping America’s security and economic policies. (Full disclosure: I was once brought in as a consultant to evaluate one of the NIC’s interim reports.) On Monday, the Council released its newest findings, Global Trends 2030. Many of the prognostications are rather unsurprising: rising tides, a bigger data cloud, an aging population, and, of course, more drones. But tucked into the predictable predictions are some rather eye-opening assertions. Especially in the medical realm.
We’ve seen experimental prosthetics in recent years that are connected to the human neurological system. The Council says the link between man and machine is about to get way more cyborg-like. “As replacement limb technology advances, people may choose to enhance their physical selves as they do with cosmetic surgery today. Future retinal eye implants could enable night vision, and neuro-enhancements could provide superior memory recall or speed of thought,” the Council writes. “Brain-machine interfaces could provide ‘superhuman’ abilities, enhancing strength and speed, as well as providing functions not previously available.”
And if the machines can’t be embedded into the person, the person may embed himself in the robot. “Augmented reality systems can provide enhanced experiences of real-world situations. Combined with advances in robotics, avatars could provide feedback in the form of sensors providing touch and smell as well as aural and visual information to the operator,” the report adds. There’s no word about whether you’ll have to paint yourself blue to enjoy the benefits of this tech.

U.S. Spies See Superhumans, Instant Cities by 2030

BY NOAH SHACHTMAN 12.10.12


3-D printed organs. Brain chips providing superhuman abilities. Megacities, built from scratch. The U.S. intelligence community is taking a look at the world of 2030. And it is very, very sci-fi.

Every four or five years, the futurists at the National Intelligence Council take a stab at forecasting what the globe will be like two decades hence; the idea is to give some long-term, strategic guidance to the folks shaping America’s security and economic policies. (Full disclosure: I was once brought in as a consultant to evaluate one of the NIC’s interim reports.) On Monday, the Council released its newest findings, Global Trends 2030. Many of the prognostications are rather unsurprising: rising tides, a bigger data cloud, an aging population, and, of course, more drones. But tucked into the predictable predictions are some rather eye-opening assertions. Especially in the medical realm.

We’ve seen experimental prosthetics in recent years that are connected to the human neurological system. The Council says the link between man and machine is about to get way more cyborg-like. “As replacement limb technology advances, people may choose to enhance their physical selves as they do with cosmetic surgery today. Future retinal eye implants could enable night vision, and neuro-enhancements could provide superior memory recall or speed of thought,” the Council writes. “Brain-machine interfaces could provide ‘superhuman’ abilities, enhancing strength and speed, as well as providing functions not previously available.”

And if the machines can’t be embedded into the person, the person may embed himself in the robot. “Augmented reality systems can provide enhanced experiences of real-world situations. Combined with advances in robotics, avatars could provide feedback in the form of sensors providing touch and smell as well as aural and visual information to the operator,” the report adds. There’s no word about whether you’ll have to paint yourself blue to enjoy the benefits of this tech.

Smart buildings - the future of building technology

Uploaded by  on Dec 22, 2010

Movie “smart buildings - the future of building technology”
A study on the future of building technology shows that requirements are undergoing lasting changes.

Living Tomorrow: house of the future

Living Tomorrow was founded in 1991 by architects Frank Belien and Peter Bongers. Their mission was to create a platform on which several companies could show their innovative ideas. Have you ever wondered what a future home will look like? We have been there, so watch here and find out. 

Watch the original: http://www.wannahaves.com/item/babef08a/a/living-tomorrow

'Stalker' app pulled after 'tool for rapists' outcry
An iPhone app that in effect allowed users to stalk women nearby using location-based social networking service Foursquare has been pulled from the iTunes app store by its developer after an outcry.
The “Girls Around Me" app used publicly available data from the check-in service Foursquare to show where women had checked in nearby. Foursquare then yanked the Girls Around Me app’s access to its data. This, in turn, led to the app’s developer removing it from iTunes as it did not work properly.
"This is a violation of our API [application programming interface] policy, so we’ve reached out to the developer and shut off their API access,” Laura Covington, a Foursquare spokeswoman, said in statement to The New York Times.
Advertisement: Story continues below
In addition to showing on a map women who had checked in to locations nearby using Foursquare, the app also let users view Facebook information of those women if they had tied their Facebook accounts to their Foursquare accounts and if their Facebook account privacy settings were lax enough to allow any user to access it.

'Stalker' app pulled after 'tool for rapists' outcry

An iPhone app that in effect allowed users to stalk women nearby using location-based social networking service Foursquare has been pulled from the iTunes app store by its developer after an outcry.

The “Girls Around Me" app used publicly available data from the check-in service Foursquare to show where women had checked in nearby. Foursquare then yanked the Girls Around Me app’s access to its data. This, in turn, led to the app’s developer removing it from iTunes as it did not work properly.

"This is a violation of our API [application programming interface] policy, so we’ve reached out to the developer and shut off their API access,” Laura Covington, a Foursquare spokeswoman, said in statement to The New York Times.

In addition to showing on a map women who had checked in to locations nearby using Foursquare, the app also let users view Facebook information of those women if they had tied their Facebook accounts to their Foursquare accounts and if their Facebook account privacy settings were lax enough to allow any user to access it.

The City With No People
"Imagine a city with buildings, roads and offices, but no residents. Robert Brumley and his company Pegasus Global Holdings, are creating the Center for Innovation Testing and Evaluation. Which is basically a full functioning city designed for just that –testing and evaluation-… just minus the people." 
In an interview on Spark (CBC), Robert Brumley justifies this enormous investment with the revenue expected from future products. The ghost city will facilitate the on-the-ground testing of latest technological inventions. Yet, it is clear that this “testing” is strictly about perfecting the performance of networked devices installed in private homes, and not about doing abstract humanitarian investigation into social implications or health effects of developed products. In other words, this sounds like a live size prototype of the smart city, where everything is digital, connected, visible and centrally controlled. (Follow the CBC link for the podcast of the interview.)

The City With No People

"Imagine a city with buildings, roads and offices, but no residents. Robert Brumley and his company Pegasus Global Holdings, are creating the Center for Innovation Testing and Evaluation. Which is basically a full functioning city designed for just that –testing and evaluation-… just minus the people." 

In an interview on Spark (CBC), Robert Brumley justifies this enormous investment with the revenue expected from future products. The ghost city will facilitate the on-the-ground testing of latest technological inventions. Yet, it is clear that this “testing” is strictly about perfecting the performance of networked devices installed in private homes, and not about doing abstract humanitarian investigation into social implications or health effects of developed products. In other words, this sounds like a live size prototype of the smart city, where everything is digital, connected, visible and centrally controlled. (Follow the CBC link for the podcast of the interview.)

(Source: cbc.ca)

Virtual projection lets you share your phone’s screen

Want to show that must-see video to your friends, but don’t want to crowd around a tiny screen? Or perhaps you have an important document on your handset to share during a large meeting. You could try a phone with a built-in projector, but wouldn’t it be easier to use your regular device? Now you can, thanks to “virtual projection”, a system for sharing your screen on to any nearby display.

It works like this: when you hold your phone up to the screen of a computer running the virtual projection software, the phone’s camera constantly captures and compares images from the screen to work out its location. This information is passed back to the computer via Wi-Fi to place the virtual projection in the right place on the screen.

Moving the phone will rotate and distort the image just like a regular optical projector, but it is also possible to turn this off, giving you a stable image even if you move and allowing you to put the phone down. Multiple users can also place images on the same screen, allowing them to work together.

Biometric Passwords: Computer scientists in Brooklyn are training their iPads to recognize their owners by the touch of their fingers as they make a caressing gesture. Banks are already using software that recognizes your voice, supplementing the standard PIN.

And after years of predicting its demise, security researchers are renewing their efforts to supplement and perhaps one day obliterate the old-fashioned password.

“If you ask me what is the biggest nuisance today, I would say it’s the 40 different passwords I have to create and change,” said Nasir Memon, a computer science professor at the Polytechnic Institute of New York University in Brooklyn who is leading the iPad project.