U.S. Spies See Superhumans, Instant Cities by 2030
BY NOAH SHACHTMAN 12.10.12
3-D printed organs. Brain chips providing superhuman abilities. Megacities, built from scratch. The U.S. intelligence community is taking a look at the world of 2030. And it is very, very sci-fi.
Every four or five years, the futurists at the National Intelligence Council take a stab at forecasting what the globe will be like two decades hence; the idea is to give some long-term, strategic guidance to the folks shaping America’s security and economic policies. (Full disclosure: I was once brought in as a consultant to evaluate one of the NIC’s interim reports.) On Monday, the Council released its newest findings, Global Trends 2030. Many of the prognostications are rather unsurprising: rising tides, a bigger data cloud, an aging population, and, of course, more drones. But tucked into the predictable predictions are some rather eye-opening assertions. Especially in the medical realm.
We’ve seen experimental prosthetics in recent years that are connected to the human neurological system. The Council says the link between man and machine is about to get way more cyborg-like. “As replacement limb technology advances, people may choose to enhance their physical selves as they do with cosmetic surgery today. Future retinal eye implants could enable night vision, and neuro-enhancements could provide superior memory recall or speed of thought,” the Council writes. “Brain-machine interfaces could provide ‘superhuman’ abilities, enhancing strength and speed, as well as providing functions not previously available.”
And if the machines can’t be embedded into the person, the person may embed himself in the robot. “Augmented reality systems can provide enhanced experiences of real-world situations. Combined with advances in robotics, avatars could provide feedback in the form of sensors providing touch and smell as well as aural and visual information to the operator,” the report adds. There’s no word about whether you’ll have to paint yourself blue to enjoy the benefits of this tech.

U.S. Spies See Superhumans, Instant Cities by 2030

BY NOAH SHACHTMAN 12.10.12


3-D printed organs. Brain chips providing superhuman abilities. Megacities, built from scratch. The U.S. intelligence community is taking a look at the world of 2030. And it is very, very sci-fi.

Every four or five years, the futurists at the National Intelligence Council take a stab at forecasting what the globe will be like two decades hence; the idea is to give some long-term, strategic guidance to the folks shaping America’s security and economic policies. (Full disclosure: I was once brought in as a consultant to evaluate one of the NIC’s interim reports.) On Monday, the Council released its newest findings, Global Trends 2030. Many of the prognostications are rather unsurprising: rising tides, a bigger data cloud, an aging population, and, of course, more drones. But tucked into the predictable predictions are some rather eye-opening assertions. Especially in the medical realm.

We’ve seen experimental prosthetics in recent years that are connected to the human neurological system. The Council says the link between man and machine is about to get way more cyborg-like. “As replacement limb technology advances, people may choose to enhance their physical selves as they do with cosmetic surgery today. Future retinal eye implants could enable night vision, and neuro-enhancements could provide superior memory recall or speed of thought,” the Council writes. “Brain-machine interfaces could provide ‘superhuman’ abilities, enhancing strength and speed, as well as providing functions not previously available.”

And if the machines can’t be embedded into the person, the person may embed himself in the robot. “Augmented reality systems can provide enhanced experiences of real-world situations. Combined with advances in robotics, avatars could provide feedback in the form of sensors providing touch and smell as well as aural and visual information to the operator,” the report adds. There’s no word about whether you’ll have to paint yourself blue to enjoy the benefits of this tech.

Smart buildings - the future of building technology

Uploaded by  on Dec 22, 2010

Movie “smart buildings - the future of building technology”
A study on the future of building technology shows that requirements are undergoing lasting changes.

The City With No People
"Imagine a city with buildings, roads and offices, but no residents. Robert Brumley and his company Pegasus Global Holdings, are creating the Center for Innovation Testing and Evaluation. Which is basically a full functioning city designed for just that –testing and evaluation-… just minus the people." 
In an interview on Spark (CBC), Robert Brumley justifies this enormous investment with the revenue expected from future products. The ghost city will facilitate the on-the-ground testing of latest technological inventions. Yet, it is clear that this “testing” is strictly about perfecting the performance of networked devices installed in private homes, and not about doing abstract humanitarian investigation into social implications or health effects of developed products. In other words, this sounds like a live size prototype of the smart city, where everything is digital, connected, visible and centrally controlled. (Follow the CBC link for the podcast of the interview.)

The City With No People

"Imagine a city with buildings, roads and offices, but no residents. Robert Brumley and his company Pegasus Global Holdings, are creating the Center for Innovation Testing and Evaluation. Which is basically a full functioning city designed for just that –testing and evaluation-… just minus the people." 

In an interview on Spark (CBC), Robert Brumley justifies this enormous investment with the revenue expected from future products. The ghost city will facilitate the on-the-ground testing of latest technological inventions. Yet, it is clear that this “testing” is strictly about perfecting the performance of networked devices installed in private homes, and not about doing abstract humanitarian investigation into social implications or health effects of developed products. In other words, this sounds like a live size prototype of the smart city, where everything is digital, connected, visible and centrally controlled. (Follow the CBC link for the podcast of the interview.)